Know – Want to know – Learned

This activity builds upon prior knowledge and develops teamwork skills.

This method can be used as an introductory strategy in order for pupils to document their present level of knowledge and what gaps may exist in that knowledge, to structure progress in their learning and to analyse what new information has been learned after research. This activity builds upon prior knowledge and understanding and develops teamwork skills. If the K-W-L is carried out in groups, it may consolidate communication skills and teamwork. On a K-W-L grid (see below), pupils write under ‘K’ what they think they already know about a particular topic or issue. If pupils are working in groups, they may wish to use a Post-It style activity before writing their combined ideas onto the grid.

Choose a particular topic for the activity, perhaps a topic which is relevant to the current subject.

On a K-W-L grid (see image), before the lesson pupils write under ‘K’ what they think they already know about a particular topic, then fill out the ‘W’. At the end they return and fill out the ‘L’.

Mind Movies

Encourages pupils to engage in discussion about a particular issue and share ideas.

This creative activity can be a useful tool for introducing a topic, encouraging pupils to engage in discussion about a particular issue and sharing ideas. Pupils close their eyes. The facilitator reads a short story or explains a scenario to the class. Pupils are asked to imagine what is happening or what is being explained in their minds. Once the story or explanation has been completed, pupils are asked to continue where the reader left off and develop the story/scene in their minds for a further period of time. Pupils then describe, either in groups or as a whole class, what developments took place in their mind movies. This might be a good way to develop discussion on issues.

Choose a short story which pupils are familar with or within the same context of the current class subject.

Pupils close their eyes and the faciliator reads a short story. Pupils then are asked to continue the story in their mind, then come together to discuss their possible outcomes.

Hot Air Balloon

Encourages pupils to confront an issue and explore its implications further.

This activity can be used as a planning tool. It encourages pupils to confront an issue, explore its implications in a comprehensive manner and adopt a structured approach to future preparation and planning.Pupils are given a structured set of questions around a particular issue, including: Who needs to be in the balloon? Pupils write the names of key people around the issue – people who need to be on board in order for it to go anywhere. What needs to be in place for the project to be successful? On the balloon itself, pupils note all the elements which they think are necessary in order for the project (planning) to be successful.

You don’t have to have to use a balloon you could pick vehicle pupils are more familar with.

Ask pupils to list who needs to be in the balloon in order for it to take off. What outcomes are needed for the project to be successful what potential failures could there be?

Five Questions

An information gathering activity which gives pupuls the opportunity to unpack complicated topics.

This is an information gathering activity which also allows pupils to explore the issue in more depth or to break it down into smaller sub-themes or tasks. It gives pupils the opportunity to unpack complicated topics. It allows an exploration of all kinds of possibilities which may lead to action planning and target-setting. See Ideas Avalanche and Post-Its Collection for further information gathering activities. A large, wide sheet of paper and a marker are needed.. A question is posed to pupils using ‘How’ or ‘Why’. Teachers use the same question word to develop ideas and explore further ideas. Teachers continue to use questions with the same question word until the idea/suggestion has been explored fully

How can we get young people involved in the community? How can we promote issues? How can we raise awareness?

A question is posed to pupils using ‘How’ or ‘Why’, the same question word is used to explore the idea. It stops when the idea has been explored fully.